Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
Primedic
Schiller
VIEWORKS

Protection Device Minimizes Brain Damage in Cardiovascular Procedures

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 02 Oct 2013
Image: The TriGuard Cerebral Protection Device (Photo courtesy of Keystone Heart).
Image: The TriGuard Cerebral Protection Device (Photo courtesy of Keystone Heart).
An innovative cerebral protection device (CPD) reduces the volume of new brain lesions, especially during protected transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

The TriGuard CPD is a Nitinol mesh embolic debris deflection device designed to cover all three aortic cerebral branches to minimize the risk of brain damage during cardiovascular (CV) procedures, and accommodates most anatomical variations of the aortic arch. The Nitinol frame and mesh are designed to be flexible and atraumatic, yet robust and sturdy, thus providing simple placement and retrieval.

The device is placed via one of two femoral artery access ports typically used in TAVR, eliminating the need for a third puncture site, and deploys rapidly, self-positioning through a 3-mm catheter. Studies have shown that compared with historical data on unprotected TAVR procedures, use of the TriGuard CPD decreased maximum total lesion volume by 95%, while average total lesion volume was 57% smaller, when compared with historical references. The TriGuard Cerebral Protection Device is a product of Keystone Heart (Caesarea, Israel), and has received the European community CE marking of approval.

“Cerebral function is the essence of quality of life. Its preservation throughout medical procedures is a key component to procedural success and patient care. TriGuard is the most sophisticated cerebral embolic protection device currently available,” said Andreas Baumbach, MD, consultant cardiologist at University Hospitals Bristol (United Kingdom). “The device has the potential to become a routine preventive measure in TAVR and other cardiovascular procedures associated with embolic lesions.”

Cerebral emboli are commonly associated with left-sided cardiac procedures. During CV procedures, debris from the aortic valve, ascending aorta, and other sources may embolize and cause cerebral infarction. Cerebral damage may not be clinically evident after CV procedures and can take months or years for symptoms to manifest, often as devastating stroke, dementia, and cognitive decline. Embolic brain lesions can be objectively and consistently detected by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI).

Related Links:

Keystone Heart
University Hospitals Bristol



Channels

Critical Care

view channel

Arm Approach Safer for Cardiac Catheterization

Patients undergoing a coronary angiogram had a significantly lower risk of major bleeding and death when accessed through the arm rather than the groin, according to a new study. Researchers at Erasmus University Medical Center (Rotterdam, The Netherlands) randomized more than 8,400 angiogram patients at 78 hospitals... Read more

Women's Health

view channel

Women Undergoing Heart Attack Delay Hospital Arrival

Women suffering a heart attack wait much longer than men to call emergency medical services and face significantly longer delays getting to a hospital, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Bologna (Italy) examined records of 7,457 European patients enrolled from 2010 to 2014 in an international... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: ResolutionMD across multiple devices (Photo courtesy of Calgary Scientific).

Healthcare Communication Platform Offers Seamless Image Access

Novel diagnostic medical imaging software offers better access to health information, supports increased teamwork, and enhances communication among practitioners and patients. ResolutionMD enables doctors... Read more

Business

view channel

Universal Public Drug Coverage Would Save Canada Billions

A new study claims that Canada could save CAD 7.3 billion annually by providing universal public coverage of medically necessary prescription drugs. Researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC; Vancouver, Canada) and the University of Toronto (ON, Canada) used published data on prescribing patterns and costs... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.