Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
Schiller
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
Ampronix

Implant Stiffness Leads to Foreign Body Reactions

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 26 Feb 2014
Image: Cell Morpholgy in relation to surface stiffness (Photo courtesy of the University of Cambridge).
Image: Cell Morpholgy in relation to surface stiffness (Photo courtesy of the University of Cambridge).
A new study reveals that surgical implant stiffness is a major cause of foreign body reaction (FBR) inflammatory reactions.

Researchers at the University of Cambridge (United Kingdom) implanted composite foreign bodies—one side as soft as neural tissue and the other as stiff as muscle—into rats' brains to examine the impact of an implant's stiffness on the inflammatory process. The researchers found that both primary rat microglial cells and astrocytes responded to the increased contact stiffness by changes in morphology and upregulation of a multitude of inflammatory genes and proteins, with FBR significantly enhanced around the stiff portions of the implant.

The researchers found that the morphologically, the cells around the stiffer substrate were very flat, whereas those grown on the softer substrate looked much more like normal cells found in the brain. According to the researchers, the results suggest that adapting the surface stiffness of electrodes used as neural implants for the stimulation of nervous tissue could minimize adverse reactions and improve biocompatibility. The study was published early online on February 11, 2014, in Biomaterials.

“Brain tissue is as soft as cream cheese; it is one of the softest tissues in the body, and electrodes are orders of magnitude stiffer. The findings could have major implications for the design of implants used in the brain and other parts of the body,” said study coauthor Kristian Franze. “Our results suggest that in the short term, simply coating existing implants with materials that match the stiffness of the tissue they are being implanted into will help reduce foreign body reactions.”

Implant FBR in the brain can cause the implants to be encapsulated by reactive tissue, which in the CNS consists mainly of microglial cells and astrocytes, which are surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM). The reactive process, which starts with the activation of glial cells, can damage local neurons, and the subsequent dendritic retraction and neuronal death may contribute to a gradual decline in the function of implanted electrodes.

Related Links:

University of Cambridge 



JD Honigberg International
Inditherm
Harloff

Channels

Critical Care

view channel

Little Evidence Supports Opioid Use for Chronic Pain

A new study reveals that there is paltry evidence for the long-term safety and efficacy of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain. Researchers at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU; Portland, USA) and the University of Washington (Seattle, USA) searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled... Read more

Women's Health

view channel

Pregnant Women in Austria Experience Iodine Deficiency

A new study suggests that pregnant women in Austria have a potentially clinically significant iodine deficiency which could impair embryonic brain development. Researchers at the Medical University of Vienna (Austria) conducted a cross-sectional investigation of urinary iodine excretion in 246 pregnant women (2 in the... Read more

Health IT

view channel

Computer Model Predicts Public Response to Disease Outbreaks

A new computer model could help public health officials anticipate public reactions to disease outbreaks, based on a combination of data collected from hospitals, social media, and other sources. Researchers at MIT (Cambridge, MA, USA), the Draper Laboratory (Cambridge, MA, USA), and Ascel Bio (Larchmont, NY, USA),... Read more

Business

view channel

Abbott Completes Topera Acquisition

Abbott (Abbott Park, IL, USA) has completed its acquisition of Topera (Menlo Park, CA, USA), developer of innovative electrophysiology technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). The Topera rotor identification system helps physicians identify and target patient-specific rotors that have... Read more
 

Events

05 Mar 2015 - 08 Mar 2015
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.