We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

Brain Stimulation Reduces Spasticity after Spinal Cord Injury

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 03 Jul 2017
Print article
A new study claims that excitatory intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) is successful in reducing spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI).

Researchers at Paracelsus Medical University (Salzburg, Austria), the University of Verona (Italy), and other institutions conducted a study to investigate if iTBS, a safe, non-invasive and well-tolerated protocol of excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), is effective in modulating spasticity. The study included ten subjects with incomplete cervical or thoracic SCI. Five patients received 10 days of real or iTBS, and the remaining five received sham treatment. After two months, the sham group was switched to real iTBS and the study continued.

The researchers measured motor-evoked potentials (MEP) in the soleus (calf muscle), during magnetic stimulation over the most responsive area of the scalp. M-wave and H reflexes, which are measures of muscle contractions due to stimulation of the tibial nerve, were assessed for each subject, and an H/M amplitude ratio was determined. Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and the Spinal Cord Injury Assessment Tool for Spasticity (SCAT) were also compared before and after the stimulation protocols.

The results showed that patients receiving real iTBS showed significant increased resting and active MEPs amplitude and a significant reduction of the H/M amplitude ratio. In addition, both MAS and SCAT scores were significantly reduced after treatment. The changes persisted up to one week after the end of the iTBS treatment, and were not observed under the sham-iTBS condition, suggesting that iTBS may be a promising therapeutic tool for spasticity in SCI patients. The study was published on June 6, 2017, in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience.

“Patients receiving real iTBS, compared to those receiving sham treatment, showed significant improvement,” said lead author Raffaele Nardone, MD, PhD, of Paracelsus Medical University. “In comparison with standard rTMS protocols, iTBS represents a more feasible approach because of lower stimulation intensity and shorter duration of application in each single session.”

Spasticity is a muscle control disorder caused by an imbalance between signals from the central nervous system (CNS) to the muscles. It is often found in people with cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury (TBI), SCI, stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS). It is characterized by increased muscle tone, overactive reflexes, involuntary movements, which may include spasms and clonus, pain, decreased functional abilities, abnormal posture, contractures, and bone and joint deformities.

Related Links:
Paracelsus Medical University
University of Verona

Print article
Radcal

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: ‘Hologram patients’ developed to help train doctors and nurses (Photo courtesy of University of Cambridge)

Life-Like Hologram Patients Train Doctors for Real-Time Decision Making in Emergencies

A medical training project using 'mixed reality' technology aims to make consistent, high-level and relevant clinical training more accessible across the world. University of Cambridge (Cambridge, UK)... Read more

Critical Care

view channel
Image: New device could provide alternative to opioids and other highly addictive drugs (Photo courtesy of Northwestern University)

Dissolving Implantable Device Can Manage Post-Operative Pain Without Drugs

Researchers have developed a small, soft, flexible implant that relieves pain on demand without the use of drugs. The first-of-its-kind device could provide a much-needed alternative to opioids and other... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: The biomolecular film can be picked up with tweezers and placed onto a wound (Photo courtesy of TUM)

Biomolecular Wound Healing Film Adheres to Sensitive Tissue and Releases Active Ingredients

Conventional bandages may be very effective for treating smaller skin abrasions, but things get more difficult when it comes to soft-tissue injuries such as on the tongue or on sensitive surfaces like... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: AI can reveal a patient`s heart health (Photo courtesy of Mayo Clinic)

AI Trained for Specific Vocal Biomarkers Could Accurately Predict Coronary Artery Disease

Earlier studies have examined the use of voice analysis for identifying voice markers associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Other research groups have explored the use of similar... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: Expanding the role of autonomous robots can mitigate the shortage of physicians (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Robot-Assisted Surgical Devices Market Driven by Increased Demand for Patient-Specific Surgeries

An aging population and accompanying retirements will cause a significant physician shortfall of 55,000 to 150,000 by 2030, creating a gap in the healthcare system. Expanding the role of autonomous robots... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.