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Ground-Breaking 'Pan-Corona Antivirals' Could Stop SARS-CoV-2 in Its Tracks When Used at First Sign of COVID-19 Symptoms

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 14 Apr 2021
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Image: Professor Imre Berger (Photo courtesy of University of Bristol)
Image: Professor Imre Berger (Photo courtesy of University of Bristol)
Clinical trials will shortly be launched into pivotal, cost-effective antiviral treatments for COVID-19 following the discovery of a molecule which changes the shape of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and in so doing inhibits the virus’ ability to enter cells.

A team of top scientists from the University of Bristol (Bristol, UK) who made the recent breakthrough discovery has founded Halo Therapeutics Ltd. (Bristol, UK), a new biotech company for developing ground-breaking and newly patented potential treatments for coronavirus. Studies show the treatments are potentially 'pan-corona antivirals' in that they will work against all coronavirus strains - including the highly contagious UK, South African and Brazilian variants. The company is preparing for clinical trials. If approved, the antivirals could be used by patients globally at the first sign of COVID-19 symptoms - stopping the virus in its tracks.

The team of scientists had found that exposing the SARS-CoV-2 (coronavirus) virus to a free fatty acid called linoleic acid locks the virus’ spike protein into a closed, non-infective form stopping it in its tracks. The company is now preparing to make an application to start clinical trials with infected patients. If proven to be effective, the antivirals could be used by people of all ages worldwide at the first sign of COVID-19 symptoms, or if they have been in contact with someone with the virus, preventing the virus from taking hold and stopping further transmission.

Lab studies indicate the antiviral will work against all pathogenic coronavirus strains including the highly contagious UK, South African and Brazilian variants by preventing the virus from penetrating cells in the nose, throat and lungs. The treatments under development by Halo Therapeutics include a nasal spray and an asthma-type inhaler, and offer the possibility of a game-changing pan-coronavirus antiviral to treat patients at all stages of the disease and to reduce the transmission of the virus. The Halo Therapeutics team is currently engaging investors to help finance multiple parallel clinical trials. If approved, the antiviral treatments could potentially start rolling out to patients globally.

"The aim of our treatment is to significantly reduce the amount of virus that enters the body and to stop it from multiplying," explained Professor Imre Berger, Director of the Max Planck-Bristol Centre for Minimal Biology at Bristol and one of the team leading the drug’s development. "Then, even if people are infected with the virus or exposed to it, they will not become ill because the antiviral prevents the virus from spreading to the lungs and beyond. Importantly, because the viral load will be so low it will likely also stop transmission."

"Our vision is that at the first sign of the disease, whether you come into contact with someone who has COVID-19 or you have early symptoms, you would self-medicate at home to stop the virus in its tracks and prevent you from getting ill," added Professor Christiane Berger-Schaffitzel from Bristol's School of Biochemistry.

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