We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

Surgical Robot with Humanoid-Shaped Arms Replicates Surgeon’s Motions

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 29 Jun 2022
Print article
Image: Hominis Surgical System for robotic-assisted transvaginal hysterectomy (Photo courtesy of Memic Innovative Surgery)
Image: Hominis Surgical System for robotic-assisted transvaginal hysterectomy (Photo courtesy of Memic Innovative Surgery)

Robot-assisted surgery is regarded as a must-have by doctors and patients everywhere, due to advances in precision and dexterity, superior control, device multi-functionality, ergonomics, and avoidance of hand tremor and fulcrum effects. Yet even today’s gold-standard solutions remain a mixed offering. Despite being mainstays of minimally-invasive surgery, many robotic procedures require multi-port access and provide limited maneuverability to the surgeon – who is furthermore required to master a massively complex, unintuitive user interface. Due to these and other limitations, these procedures have not been proven to substantially reduce complication rates. Now, the first and only FDA-authorized surgical robot with humanoid-shaped arms designed to replicate the motions and capabilities of a surgeon’s arms provides outstanding surgical and ergonomics capabilities while keeping cost and footprint to a minimum.

The Hominis Surgical System for robotic-assisted transvaginal hysterectomy from Memic Innovative Surgery Ltd. (Tel Aviv, Israel) is the first and only FDA-authorized surgical robot that features miniature humanoid-shaped arms, with shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints that provide high dexterity and unprecedented articulation. The Hominis System is designed to replicate the motions and capabilities of a surgeon's arms. Multiple instruments can be introduced into the body through a single portal and the unprecedented articulation offers optimal access and working angles.

Hominis requires a much smaller footprint and costs significantly less than conventional robotic systems, making it possible for more hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers to acquire the system and offer more patients the benefits of less invasive robotic surgery. Hominis was granted de novo marketing authorization from the FDA in February 2021. Two hospitals have successfully completed the first U.S. patient procedures using the Hominis Surgical System for robotic-assisted transvaginal hysterectomy.

"It is very encouraging to see the first two U.S. commercial sites actively performing benign gynecological procedures using our Hominis System and we are grateful for their support," said Dvir Cohen, president and chief executive officer of Memic. "Hominis is well positioned as a disruptive technology that will transform the way surgeons perform minimally invasive robotic-assisted procedures."

Related Links:
Memic Innovative Surgery Ltd.


Print article
IIR Middle East

Channels

Critical Care

view channel
Image: Three dimensional measurement of the all-mesh thermistor (Photo courtesy of Shinshu University)

Ultraflexible, Gas-Permeable Thermistors to Pave Way for On-Skin Medical Sensors and Implantable Devices

On-skin medical sensors and wearable health devices are important health care tools that must be incredibly flexible and ultrathin so they can move with the human body. In addition, the technology has... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: The biomolecular film can be picked up with tweezers and placed onto a wound (Photo courtesy of TUM)

Biomolecular Wound Healing Film Adheres to Sensitive Tissue and Releases Active Ingredients

Conventional bandages may be very effective for treating smaller skin abrasions, but things get more difficult when it comes to soft-tissue injuries such as on the tongue or on sensitive surfaces like... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: Using digital data can improve health outcomes (Photo courtesy of Unsplash)

Electronic Health Records May Be Key to Improving Patient Care, Study Finds

When a patient gets transferred from a hospital to a nearby specialist or rehabilitation facility, it is often difficult for personnel at the new facility to access the patient’s electronic health records... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.