We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Detecto

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

Skin-Worn Biosensors Fashioned from Old CDs Can Monitor Health Markers

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 12 Aug 2022
Print article
Image: New research turns CDs into flexible and inexpensive biosensors (Photo courtesy of Binghamton University)
Image: New research turns CDs into flexible and inexpensive biosensors (Photo courtesy of Binghamton University)

Billions of discarded CDs end up in landfills across the world with negative environmental consequences. Now, new research offers a second life for CDs by turning them into flexible biosensors that are inexpensive and easy to manufacture, and can monitor various health conditions and markers.

Researchers at Binghamton University (Binghamton, NY, USA) have shown how a gold CD’s thin metallic layer can be separated from the rigid plastic and fashioned into sensors to monitor electrical activity in human hearts and muscles as well as lactose, glucose, pH and oxygen levels. The sensors can communicate with a smartphone via Bluetooth. The fabrication is completed in 20 to 30 minutes without releasing toxic chemicals or needing expensive equipment, and it costs about USD 1.50 per device.

The researchers initially began by investigating previous research on biosensors made from CDs, but found that those sensors retained a rigid structure and had a more limited number of applications than they hoped to achieve. The first step was removing the metallic coating from the plastic beneath using a chemical process and adhesive tape. The researchers loosened the layer of metals from the CD and then picked up that metal layer with tape, so they could just peel it off. That thin layer is then processed and flexible.

To create the sensors, the researchers used a Cricut cutter, an off-the-shelf machine for crafters that generally cuts designs from materials like paper, vinyl, card stock and iron-on transfers. The flexible circuits then would be removed and stuck onto a person. With the help of a smartphone app, medical professionals or patients could get readings and track progress over time. The researchers are thrilled to see something they speculated could be possible almost a decade ago is now a reality, and have ideas about how the CD-to-sensor technology could be improved.

“We used gold CDs, and we want to explore silver-based CDs, which I believe are more common,” said Matthew Brown, PhD ’22. “How can we upcycle those types of CDs with the same kind of process? We also want to look at if we can utilize laser engraving rather than using the fabric-based cutter to improve the upcycling speed even further.”

Related Links:
Binghamton University 

BMP Whole Blood Analyzer: GEM Premier ChemSTAT
Gold Supplier
Infectious Diseases Controls
Multichem ID-SeroNeg
New
Benchtop Coagulation Analyzer
Ci300
New
C-Reactive Protein Test
PLUS CRP Turbilatex

Print article
Radcal

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: AI transforms smartwatch ECG signals into a diagnostic tool for heart failure (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

AI-Based Smartwatch Accurately Detects Heart Failure Using ECG Signals

People with a weak heart pump might not have symptoms, but this common form of heart disease affects about 2% of the population and 9% of people over 60. When the heart cannot pump enough oxygen-rich blood,... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: Bioelectric medicine could stem excessive blood loss (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Wearable Neurostimulation Solution Could Stem Excessive Blood Loss in the OR

A wearable neurostimulation solution focused on lessening excessive blood loss could save precious time for surgical teams in the operating room. A collaboration between Spark Biomedical, Inc.... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: The digital stretcher scales are designed specifically for emergent situations in hospitals and emergency rooms (Photo courtesy of DETECTO)

Portable High-Capacity Digital Stretcher Scales Provide Precision Weighing for Patients in ER

For emergency arrivals into a hospital, time is of the essence for gathering patient weights. Now, digital stretcher scales specifically designed for emergent situations in hospitals and emergency rooms... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: Using digital data can improve health outcomes (Photo courtesy of Unsplash)

Electronic Health Records May Be Key to Improving Patient Care, Study Finds

When a patient gets transferred from a hospital to a nearby specialist or rehabilitation facility, it is often difficult for personnel at the new facility to access the patient’s electronic health records... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: The global visualization instruments for MIS market is estimated to surpass USD 21 billion by 2031 (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Global Visualization Instruments for MIS Market Driven by Increasing Demand for Endoscopy Procedures

The last few years have witnessed an increase in patient preference for medical surgeries that involve fewer incisions. As a result, the demand for visualization instruments, which aid in achieving improved... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.