We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Detecto

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.
09 Dec 2022 - 11 Dec 2022

Dissolving Implantable Device Can Manage Post-Operative Pain Without Drugs

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 04 Jul 2022
Print article
Image: New device could provide alternative to opioids and other highly addictive drugs (Photo courtesy of Northwestern University)
Image: New device could provide alternative to opioids and other highly addictive drugs (Photo courtesy of Northwestern University)

Researchers have developed a small, soft, flexible implant that relieves pain on demand without the use of drugs. The first-of-its-kind device could provide a much-needed alternative to opioids and other highly addictive medications. The biocompatible, water-soluble device works by softly wrapping around nerves to deliver precise, targeted cooling, which numbs nerves and blocks pain signals to the brain. An external pump enables the user to remotely activate the device and then increase or decrease its intensity. After the device is no longer needed, it naturally absorbs into the body - bypassing the need for surgical extraction. The researchers believe the device will be most valuable for patients who undergo routine surgeries or even amputations that commonly require post-operative medications. Surgeons could implant the device during the procedure to help manage the patient’s post-operative pain.

The new device developed by a team of researchers at the Northwestern University (Evanston, IL, USA) leverages a simple, common concept that everyone knows: evaporation. Similar to how evaporating sweat cools the body, the device contains a liquid coolant that is induced to evaporate at the specific location of a sensory nerve. To induce a cooling effect, the device contains tiny microfluidic channels. One channel contains the liquid coolant (perfluoropentane), which is already clinically approved as an ultrasound contrast agent and for pressurized inhalers. A second channel contains dry nitrogen, an inert gas. When the liquid and gas flow into a shared chamber, a reaction occurs that causes the liquid to promptly evaporate. Simultaneously, a tiny integrated sensor monitors the temperature of the nerve to ensure that it’s not getting too cold, which could cause tissue damage.

While other cooling therapies and nerve blockers have been tested experimentally, all have limitations that the new device overcomes. Previously researchers have explored cryotherapies, for example, which are injected with a needle. Instead of targeting specific nerves, these imprecise approaches cool large areas of tissue, potentially leading to unwanted effects such as tissue damage and inflammation. At its widest point, Northwestern’s tiny device is just five millimeters wide. One end is curled into a cuff that softly wraps around a single nerve, bypassing the need for sutures. By precisely targeting only the affected nerve, the device spares surrounding regions from unnecessary cooling, which could lead to side effects. All components of the device are biocompatible and naturally absorb into the body’s biofluids over the course of days or weeks, without needing surgical extraction. The bioresorbable device is completely harmless - similar to absorbable stitches.

“The technology reported here exploits mechanisms that have some similarities to those that cause your fingers to feel numb when cold. Our implant allows that effect to be produced in a programmable way, directly and locally to targeted nerves, even those deep within surrounding soft tissues,” said Northwestern’s John A. Rogers, who led the device’s development. “Furthermore, you would like the device to simply disappear after it is no longer needed, to avoid delicate and risky procedures for surgical removal.”

Related Links:
Northwestern University 

BMP Whole Blood Analyzer: GEM Premier ChemSTAT
Gold Supplier
Auto Urinary Sediment Analyzer
EH-2030
New
Urine Test Strip
HealthMate DA-7
New
Gold Supplier
Group A Streptococcus Antigen Test
OSOM Strep A Test

Print article
Radcal

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: AI transforms smartwatch ECG signals into a diagnostic tool for heart failure (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

AI-Based Smartwatch Accurately Detects Heart Failure Using ECG Signals

People with a weak heart pump might not have symptoms, but this common form of heart disease affects about 2% of the population and 9% of people over 60. When the heart cannot pump enough oxygen-rich blood,... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: CystoSmart image enhancement and AI diagnostic tool will enhance cancer detection (Photo courtesy of Claritas HealthTech)

AI Diagnostic Tool Improves Cancer Detection in Cystoscope Images of Bladder

Bladder cancer is the 10th commonest cancer worldwide and the 6th commonest cancer amongst men. It is known to have high recurrence rates and significant risks of disease progression. Early detection of... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: Automated cleaning system allows endoscopes to be cleaned direct from clinic (Photo courtesy of Aston University)

World’s First Automated Endoscope Cleaner Fights Antimicrobial Resistance

Endoscopes are long, thin tubes with a light and camera at one end. Due to the sensitivity of the materials and electronics they cannot be sterilized in an autoclave (a machine that uses steam under pressure),... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: Using digital data can improve health outcomes (Photo courtesy of Unsplash)

Electronic Health Records May Be Key to Improving Patient Care, Study Finds

When a patient gets transferred from a hospital to a nearby specialist or rehabilitation facility, it is often difficult for personnel at the new facility to access the patient’s electronic health records... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: The global multiparameter patient monitoring systems market is expected to surpass USD 15 billion by 2028 (Photo courtesy of Unsplash)

Global Multiparameter Patient Monitoring Systems Market Driven by Rising Chronic Illnesses

Multi-parameter patient monitoring equipment is used to assess the vital signs of patients who are suffering from a serious illness. These devices are meant to give the number of data sets on one screen... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.