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Wearable Light Therapy Treats Psoriasis at Home

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 03 Aug 2017
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Image: A wearable device can treat mild psoriasis with blue light (Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare).
Image: A wearable device can treat mild psoriasis with blue light (Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare).
A novel blue light emitting diode (LED) device induces natural, drug-free processes in the skin that can significantly reduce the symptoms of mild psoriasis vulgaris.

The Royal Philips (Philips; Amsterdam, The Netherlands) BlueControl wearable device is comprised of high intensity, pulsed blue LEDs that are optimized to deliver phototherapy for mild to moderate plaque psoriasis. The 40 LEDs are set into the small, battery-driven device secured by textile fixation straps to the affected body part, such as the arms, legs, elbows, or knees. Once in position, the ultraviolet (UV) free blue light triggers natural processes in the skin that ease symptoms of psoriasis, including redness and scaling. Treatment sessions are timed for 30 minutes.

In two consecutive clinical studies in partnership with University Hospital of Aachen (Germany), patients were treated for a period of three months to investigate the efficacy and safety of the device. Overall, 84% of the patients showed an improvement in plaque symptoms (thickness, redness, and scaling) as measured by the Local Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI), when compared to baseline; in some cases, complete disappearance of plaque was observed. Furthermore, no negative side effects were recorded in the studies.

“We aim to improve people's health with a broad portfolio of proven therapy solutions to enable patients with chronic conditions to manage their health at home,” said David Aubert, general manager of the Royal Philips Light & Health business. “Philips BlueControl is a clinically proven light therapy device that can be easily integrated into a patient's daily routine.”

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition with intermittent relapses characterized by patches, papules, and plaques. Plaque psoriasis is the most common form, and typically manifests as red and white scaly patches on the top layer of the skin, creating silvery-white painful, itchy lesions. Psoriasis is generally considered a genetic disease influenced by environmental factors, and affects approximately 1-2% of the world’s population. It been linked to a host of other health problems such as arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), depression, obesity, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and stroke.


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