We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.
Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Ampronix,  Inc

Nitroglycerin Patches Do Not Improve Stroke Outcomes

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 20 Feb 2019
Print article
Image: A new study claims that nitroglycerin patches are ineffectual for lowering blood pressure during stroke (Photo courtesy of Medscape).
Image: A new study claims that nitroglycerin patches are ineffectual for lowering blood pressure during stroke (Photo courtesy of Medscape).
Transdermal delivery of nitroglycerin to lower blood pressure in suspected stroke patients does not lessen post-stroke disability, according to a new study.

Researchers at the University of Nottingham (Nottingham; United Kingdom) conducted a multicenter prospective randomized trial to investigate whether it is safe and effective for paramedics to administer nitroglycerin. The study included 1,149 patients (average age 73, 52% male) with presumed stroke and systolic blood pressure above 120 mm Hg, who were randomized to receive either a nitroglycerin patch or a sham patch in the ambulance within four hours of symptom onset. The primary outcome was a shift in disability measured at three months.

The results revealed that at 90 days, there was no difference among the overall trial population, with an average of 3 points on the 7-point scale modified Rankin Scale (mRS) in both those who got the patch and those who got sham dressings, even among those with a final diagnosis of stroke or transient ischemic stroke. Secondary outcomes revealed that the intervention was worse in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, and those enrolled within an hour of symptom onset. The study was presented at the annual International Stroke Conference, held during January 2019 in Honolulu (HW, USA).

“More than half had been diagnosed with high blood pressure, 24% had a previous stroke, while 20% had diabetes or atrial fibrillation; the primary outcome was a shift in disability measured at three months. However, nitroglycerin did not improve overall outcome,” said lead author Professor Philip Bath, DSc, of the University of Nottingham. “In patients with a brain bleed, the patch appeared to worsen outcomes. So, treatment with nitroglycerin cannot be recommended very early after stroke.”

Nitroglycerin (1,2,3-trinitroxypropane), is a dense, colorless, oily, explosive liquid which for over 130 years has been used as a potent vasodilator to treat various heart conditions, such as angina pectoris and chronic heart failure (CHF). The beneficial effects are due to nitroglycerin being converted to nitric oxide (NO), a potent venous dilator. Nitroglycerin is available in sublingual tablets, sprays, and patches.

Related Links:
University of Nottingham


Print article

Channels

Copyright © 2000-2019 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.