We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

3D Body Mapping Helps Repair Cellular Damage

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 02 Jul 2019
Print article
Image: A floating 3D scaffold providing efficient tissue engineering monitoring (Photo courtesy of ACS Nano).
Image: A floating 3D scaffold providing efficient tissue engineering monitoring (Photo courtesy of ACS Nano).
A new study reveals an innovative three-dimensional (3D) instrumented mapping technology that can monitor and track the behavior of engineered cells and tissues.

Developed by researchers at Purdue University (Lafayette, IN, USA) and Hanyang University (Seoul, Republic of Korea), the ultrabuoyant 3D scaffold remains afloat on the surface of a culture medium, providing a favorable environment for the electronic components, which remain in the air while the cells reside and grow underneath. This enables high-fidelity recording of electrical cell–substrate impedance and electrophysiological signals over long periods of time, even weeks. Currently, long-term reliable 3D monitoring is limited by the wet cell culture conditions, which are unfavorable to electronic instrument settings.

The new scaffold, on the other hand, can provide real-time monitoring of the cellular behaviors and functions, thus providing a profound impact on underlying biophysics and disease modeling. A battery of comprehensive in-vitro studies undertaken by the researchers revealed the utility of the platform as an effective tool for drug screening and tissue development following cancer treatments. They are now testing the potential of the device in stem cell therapies and the regenerative treatment of diseases. The study was published in the June 19, 2019, issue of ACS Nano.

“Tissue engineering already provides new hope for hard-to-treat disorders, and our technology brings even more possibilities. My hope is to help millions of people in need,” said senior author biomedical and mechanical engineer Chi Hwan Lee, PhD, of the Purdue College of Engineering. “This device offers an expanded set of potential options to monitor cell and tissue function after surgical transplants in diseased or damaged bodies.”

Tissue engineering, often called regenerative medicine, combines cell cultures, engineering and materials methods, and biochemical and physicochemical factors to improve or replace biological tissues. It involves the use of a tissue scaffold for the formation of new viable tissue for a medical purpose. While it was once categorized as a sub-field of biomaterials, having grown in scope and importance it can be considered as a field in its own.

Related Links:
Purdue University
Hanyang University


Print article

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: ‘Hologram patients’ developed to help train doctors and nurses (Photo courtesy of University of Cambridge)

Life-Like Hologram Patients Train Doctors for Real-Time Decision Making in Emergencies

A medical training project using 'mixed reality' technology aims to make consistent, high-level and relevant clinical training more accessible across the world. University of Cambridge (Cambridge, UK)... Read more

Critical Care

view channel
Image: Tired doctors often leave patients in unnecessary pain, according to an Israeli study (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Tired Night-Shift Physicians Less Likely to Prescribe Painkiller for Patients

A new study has revealed that physicians are far less likely to prescribe painkillers at night than during the day, indicating that the tiredness experienced by doctors is actually hurting patients.... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: The Senhance surgical system with digital laparoscopy (Photo courtesy of Asensus Surgical)

Digital Laparoscopic Platform Leverages Augmented Intelligence and Machine Learning

Challenges in laparoscopic surgery can impact cost, utilization, effectiveness, and outcomes of the procedure. For instance, the inability of the surgeon to control vision can create efficiency and safety... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: The biomolecular film can be picked up with tweezers and placed onto a wound (Photo courtesy of TUM)

Biomolecular Wound Healing Film Adheres to Sensitive Tissue and Releases Active Ingredients

Conventional bandages may be very effective for treating smaller skin abrasions, but things get more difficult when it comes to soft-tissue injuries such as on the tongue or on sensitive surfaces like... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: Expanding the role of autonomous robots can mitigate the shortage of physicians (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Robot-Assisted Surgical Devices Market Driven by Increased Demand for Patient-Specific Surgeries

An aging population and accompanying retirements will cause a significant physician shortfall of 55,000 to 150,000 by 2030, creating a gap in the healthcare system. Expanding the role of autonomous robots... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.