We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

mHealth Spectroscopy Measures Hemoglobin Optically

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 08 Jun 2020
Print article
Image: Professor Kim using the Hemoglobin smartphone app (Photo courtesy of Vincent Walter/ Purdue University)
Image: Professor Kim using the Hemoglobin smartphone app (Photo courtesy of Vincent Walter/ Purdue University)
A novel smartphone-based technique helps assess blood hemoglobin (Hgb) and blood disorders without drawing blood, claims a new study.

Developed at Purdue University (Lafayette, IN, USA), Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN, USA), and Moi University (Nairobi, Kenya), the smartphone app is based on spectral super-resolution (SSR) spectroscopy, which transforms the built-in camera of a smartphone into a hyperspectral imager, without the need for hardware modifications or accessories. The Hgb measurements are based on statistical learning of SSR of the eyelids, and reconstruction of the detailed spectra from the camera’s three color RGB data. To perform an Hgb measurement, the patient pulls down the inner eyelid to expose the small blood vessels underneath.

A healthcare professional then uses the smartphone app to take pictures of the inner eyelids. The SSR then extracts the detailed spectral information from the camera's images and a computational algorithm quantifies Hgb content from the data. The mobile app also includes features designed to stabilize image quality and synchronize the smartphone flashlight so as to obtain consistent images. The inner eyelid was selected as the sensing site because microvasculature is easily visible there, and it is not affected by skin color, which eliminates the need for any personal calibrations.

With the aid of a randomly selected group of 138 patients who had conventional blood tests at the Moi University Teaching and Referral Hospital, the researchers first trained the algorithm, and then tested the mobile health app with the remaining 15 volunteers. The results showed that the prediction errors for the smartphone technique were within 5-10% of those measured with clinical laboratory blood tests. They now plan to use the mobile health tool to assess nutritional status, anemia, and sickle cell disease. The study was published in the June 2020 issue of Optica.

“This new technology could be very useful for detecting anemia, which is characterized by low levels of blood hemoglobin. This is a major public health problem in developing countries, but can also be caused by cancer and cancer treatments,” said senior author Professor Young Kim, PhD, of Purdue University. "The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly increased awareness of the need for expanded mobile health and telemedicine services.”

Related Links:
Purdue University
Vanderbilt University
Moi University



Print article

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: Cardiologs Holter arrhythmia diagnostic software is cloud-based, vendor-neutral and powered by AI (Photo courtesy of Cardiologs)

AI Predicts Short-Term Risk of Atrial Fibrillation Using 24-Hour Holter Recordings

Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) affects millions of people each year. However, the condition is often unrecognized and untreated. Nowadays, patients are subject to 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiograms (ECGs)... Read more

Critical Care

view channel
Image: Cutting-edge 4D flow MRI scans could revolutionize blood flow assessment in the heart (Photo courtesy of University of East Anglia)

4D Flow MRI Scans Could Revolutionize Diagnosis of Patients with Heart Failure

Researchers have developed cutting-edge imaging technology to help doctors better diagnose and monitor patients with heart failure. The state-of-the-art technology uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: The Senhance surgical system with digital laparoscopy (Photo courtesy of Asensus Surgical)

Digital Laparoscopic Platform Leverages Augmented Intelligence and Machine Learning

Challenges in laparoscopic surgery can impact cost, utilization, effectiveness, and outcomes of the procedure. For instance, the inability of the surgeon to control vision can create efficiency and safety... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: AI can reveal a patient`s heart health (Photo courtesy of Mayo Clinic)

AI Trained for Specific Vocal Biomarkers Could Accurately Predict Coronary Artery Disease

Earlier studies have examined the use of voice analysis for identifying voice markers associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Other research groups have explored the use of similar... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: Expanding the role of autonomous robots can mitigate the shortage of physicians (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Robot-Assisted Surgical Devices Market Driven by Increased Demand for Patient-Specific Surgeries

An aging population and accompanying retirements will cause a significant physician shortfall of 55,000 to 150,000 by 2030, creating a gap in the healthcare system. Expanding the role of autonomous robots... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.