We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Thermo Fisher Scientific - Direct Effect Media

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

Remote Programming of Cardiac Implantable Devices Safe for MRI Scan, Shows Study

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 05 May 2022
Print article
Image: Study shows remote programming of cardiac implantable devices is safe for MRI scan (Photo courtesy of Pexels)
Image: Study shows remote programming of cardiac implantable devices is safe for MRI scan (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

More than 60 million magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are performed worldwide each year, but imaging for the millions of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers is a logistical challenge, because of concerns with how the magnetic field affects the implants. Now, a new study reveals safe and effective reprogramming of these devices is possible, even from a remote location. Remote programming could reduce the need to reschedule MRI scans and other procedures that require device programming in case there is no device representative or other qualified personnel present on-site to perform the task.

Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine (Columbia, MO, USA) conducted an observational study of 209 patients at MU Health Care’s University Hospital who underwent remote programming of their device for MRI using Medtronic RM CareLink technology. Of those scans, 51 were performed urgently. An MRI technician started each session by contacting an off-site operator and placing a programming wand on the patient’s CIED, enabling the programmer to access the device remotely and switch to an MRI-safe mode. After completing the scan, the remote programmer returned the device to the patient’s baseline settings.

“During this study, none of the patients experienced any symptoms during the scan, no one needed any changes to the baseline settings afterward, and there were no technology issues,” said senior author Sandeep Gautam, MD, associate professor of clinical medicine. “The estimated time saved per scan was 18 to 38 minutes per patient, calculated by measuring the device representative's travel time to the MRI suite.”

“We believe this technology will reduce unnecessary use of health care resources and manpower,” added Gautam. “This will eventually lead to reduction in health care costs, as it will require a smaller number of personnel for device programming, eliminate travel cost and may be especially helpful in rural areas where access to health care is limited.”

Related Links:
University of Missouri School of Medicine 


Print article

Channels

Critical Care

view channel
Image: EsoGuard has demonstrated over 90% specificity and 90% sensitivity in identifying Barrett’s Esophagus (Photo courtesy of Lucid Diagnostics)

Biomarker Based Non-Endoscopic Technology Identifies Risk for Esophageal Cancer

Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the benign and treatable precursor condition to esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) which is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and is difficult to treat. Finding BE, a sign... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: Future wearable health tech could measure gases released from skin (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Wearable Health Tech Could Measure Gases Released From Skin to Monitor Metabolic Diseases

Most research on measuring human biomarkers, which are measures of a body’s health, rely on electrical signals to sense the chemicals excreted in sweat. But sensors that rely on perspiration often require... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: AI can reveal a patient`s heart health (Photo courtesy of Mayo Clinic)

AI Trained for Specific Vocal Biomarkers Could Accurately Predict Coronary Artery Disease

Earlier studies have examined the use of voice analysis for identifying voice markers associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Other research groups have explored the use of similar... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.