We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Sekisui Diagnostics UK Ltd.

Download Mobile App




Nanodrone Detects Toxic Gases in Hazardous Environments

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 08 Aug 2019
Print article
Image: Javier Burgués (L) and Santiago Marco (R), of UB and IBEC, and the nanodrone (Photo courtesy of IBEC).
Image: Javier Burgués (L) and Santiago Marco (R), of UB and IBEC, and the nanodrone (Photo courtesy of IBEC).
A new study describes an innovative smelling nano aerial vehicle (SNAV) that can detect dangerous compounds in buildings that have collapsed due to earthquakes or explosions.

Developed at the University of Barcelona (UB, Spain), the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC; Barcelona, Spain) and Örebro University (ORU; Sweden), the SNAV nanodrone weighs just thirty-five grams, including two nanometric metal oxide semiconductor (MOX) gas sensors that can respond to carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), and other organic volatile compounds such as ethanol, acetone and benzene, with a detection threshold on the order of one part per million in volume (PPMV), according to the gas and the sensor used.

Due to its small form-factor, the SNAV is not hazardous to humans, thus enabling its use both in public areas and inside buildings, autonomously carrying out missions in hazardous environments inaccessible to terrestrial robots and bigger drones. To guide the SNAV, six radiofrequency transceivers, located in known positions, are used, which together with a transceiver in the nanodrone itself allows operators to fly it to a desired position using the built-in accelometers and gyroscopes.

As a result, the SNAV is able to work in interior spaces, crossing holes and cracks, as well as in large areas--about 160 square meters--if the chemical emission source is hidden in areas which are hard to access, such as false ceilings, air duct systems, etc. In experiments conducted at ORU, the researchers were able to build a 3D map of the gas distribution and identify the most likely source location in less than three minutes, with a 1.38-2.05 meter accuracy. The study was published in the March 2019 issue of Sensors.

“Terrestrial robots used to focus the searching on the field of chemical signaling-based localization. Today, the option of using nanodrones broadens the ability and quickness of the robots to move within an interior space and overcome obstacles such as stairs,” said senior author Santiago Marco, PhD, head of the intelligent signaling for sensor systems in bioengineering research group at UB-IBEC. “Another line we want to work on is the merge of data from multiple gas sensors to increase selectivity towards certain compounds of interest.”

Related Links:
University of Barcelona
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia
Örebro University

Gold Member
12-Channel ECG
CM1200B
Gold Member
SARS‑CoV‑2/Flu A/Flu B/RSV Sample-To-Answer Test
SARS‑CoV‑2/Flu A/Flu B/RSV Cartridge (CE-IVD)
Silver Member
Wireless Mobile ECG Recorder
NR-1207-3/NR-1207-E
New
Ultrasound Color LCD
U156W

Print article

Channels

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: New studies suggest benefit of total robotic metabolic and bariatric surgery over conventional laparoscopy (Photo courtesy of 123RF)

Total Robotic Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Proves More Beneficial than Conventional Laparoscopy

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 42.4% of Americans are affected by obesity. Research indicates that obesity can compromise the immune system, trigger chronic inflammation,... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: The portable, handheld BeamClean technology inactivates pathogens on commonly touched surfaces in seconds (Photo courtesy of Freestyle Partners)

First-Of-Its-Kind Portable Germicidal Light Technology Disinfects High-Touch Clinical Surfaces in Seconds

Reducing healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs) remains a pressing issue within global healthcare systems. In the United States alone, 1.7 million patients contract HAIs annually, leading to approximately... Read more

Point of Care

view channel
Image: POCT offers cost-effective, accessible, and immediate diagnostic solutions (Photo courtesy of Flinders University)

POCT for Infectious Diseases Delivers Laboratory Equivalent Pathology Results

On-site pathology tests for infectious diseases in rural and remote locations can achieve the same level of reliability and accuracy as those conducted in hospital laboratories, a recent study suggests.... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2024 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.