We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Feather Safety Razor

Download Mobile App





Longer Interval Between COVID-19 Vaccines Generates Up to Nine Times as Many Antibodies

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 25 Apr 2022
Print article
Image: Longer interval between COVID-19 vaccines boosts antibody production (Photo courtesy of UKHSA)
Image: Longer interval between COVID-19 vaccines boosts antibody production (Photo courtesy of UKHSA)

Understanding the immune response to vaccination against COVID-19 is integral to controlling the virus and reducing the number of deaths. New research presented at this year’s European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID 2022) has shown that a longer interval between primary COVID-19 vaccine doses can boost antibody production up to nine-fold.

To find out factors affecting antibody responses following Pfizer/BioNTech COVID vaccination, researchers at the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA, London, UK) measured antibody levels in blood samples taken from almost 6,000 healthcare workers from across the UK enrolled within the UK’s SIREN study (SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Reinfection and EvaluatioN). 3,989 of the 5,871 participants had their first dose of the vaccine at least 21 days earlier. 1,882 had their second dose at least 14 days earlier. The participants were classified by infection history as either previously having had COVID (confirmed by a PCR test or assumed due to their antibody profile) or naïve, with no history of infection. Almost all (>99%) of those who hadn’t had COVID seroconverted after vaccination, meaning they made antibodies against the virus.

Post-dose 1, those with previous infection had up to ten times higher antibody levels than naïve individuals, whilst after dose 2, those with previous infection had antibody levels more than twice as high as those who hadn’t had previous infection. When analyzing dosing intervals, it was found that longer dosing interval was associated with up antibody levels that were up to nine times higher in naïve participants (>2 and <4 weeks: 1,268.72 (1,043.25-1,542.91) and >10 weeks 11,479.73 (10,742.78-12,267.24), p=<0.0001) with a more pronounced effect observed in younger participants. Dosing interval didn’t affect antibody levels in those with previous infection. However, a longer interval between infection and vaccination was linked to higher antibody levels.

Those who had their first dose of the vaccine eight months after an infection had antibody levels seven times higher than those who were vaccinated three months after infection, with a plateau after eight months, suggesting that eight months after primary infection may be an optimum time to receive the first vaccine in those with prior infection. However, the analysis shows that regardless of timing between infection and vaccination, all individuals mount a very high antibody response after dose 2. In addition, female participants and those from an ethnic minority were associated with significantly higher antibody titers, whilst immunosuppression was associated with significantly lower post-vaccination antibody responses.

“This study shows that a longer time between vaccine dose 1 and dose 2 results in higher antibody responses in naïve participants, which strongly supports the decision by JCVI and the UK government to lengthen the interval between vaccine doses,” said Dr. Ashley Otter at the UKHSA. “We’ve also shown that in those with previous infection, timing between exposure and vaccination plays a critical role in post-vaccination antibody responses. However, further research is needed to determine whether these higher antibody levels provide greater protection against COVID-19 disease and how this longer dosing interval may affect booster responses.”

Related Links:
UKHSA


Print article

Channels

Critical Care

view channel
Image: EsoGuard has demonstrated over 90% specificity and 90% sensitivity in identifying Barrett’s Esophagus (Photo courtesy of Lucid Diagnostics)

Biomarker Based Non-Endoscopic Technology Identifies Risk for Esophageal Cancer

Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the benign and treatable precursor condition to esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) which is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and is difficult to treat. Finding BE, a sign... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: Novel surface treatment could prevent deadly hospital infections without antibiotics (Photo courtesy of Penn State)

Novel Surface Treatment Stops Microbes from Adhering to Medical Devices

Hospitals and medical clinics can be the source of nasty infections, resulting in death from infection-related complications and billions in direct medical costs. The biggest culprits, experts say - accounting... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: Future wearable health tech could measure gases released from skin (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Wearable Health Tech Could Measure Gases Released From Skin to Monitor Metabolic Diseases

Most research on measuring human biomarkers, which are measures of a body’s health, rely on electrical signals to sense the chemicals excreted in sweat. But sensors that rely on perspiration often require... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: AI can reveal a patient`s heart health (Photo courtesy of Mayo Clinic)

AI Trained for Specific Vocal Biomarkers Could Accurately Predict Coronary Artery Disease

Earlier studies have examined the use of voice analysis for identifying voice markers associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Other research groups have explored the use of similar... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.