We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Detecto

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.
16 Feb 2023 - 18 Feb 2023

Vibration Technology Improves Diagnosis of Dizziness

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 02 Feb 2022
Print article
Image: Professor Bo Håkansson undergoes VEMP testing using the B250 (Photo courtesy of Johan Bodell / Chalmers University of Technology)
Image: Professor Bo Håkansson undergoes VEMP testing using the B250 (Photo courtesy of Johan Bodell / Chalmers University of Technology)
A novel vibration device allows vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) tests to be performed at lower frequencies and volume levels.

Developed at Chalmers University of Technology (Göteborg, Sweden), audio companies Ortofon (Lolland, Denmark) and Interacoustics, and in collaboration with Sahlgrenska Academy (SA; Göteborg, Sweden), the B250 vibration device has been optimized to trigger a VEMP test, which evokes a muscle reflex contraction in the neck and eye muscles. Vestibular function can be assessed by averaging muscle activity response to each sound. The vibrating device is compatible with standardized equipment for balance diagnostics.

The biggest advantage of the B250 is that it triggers the muscle reflex at very low frequencies and volumes (maximum sound level of 75 decibels), and much lower than in current methods, which use very high sound levels, and may in fact cause permanent hearing damage. Benefits also include safer testing for children, and that patients with impaired hearing function due to chronic ear infections or congenital malformations in the ear canal and middle ear can be diagnosed for the origin of their dizziness.

“We have developed a new type of vibrating device that is placed behind the ear of the patient during the test,” said lead developer Professor Bo Håkansson, PhD, of the biomedical signals and systems unit at Chalmers. “The vibrating device is small and compact in size, and optimized to provide an adequate sound level for triggering the reflex at frequencies as low as 250 Hz, which we have found to be optimal for VEMP stimulation. Previously, no vibrating device has been available that was directly adapted for this type of test of the balance system.”

“Thanks to this bone conduction technology, the sound levels which patients are exposed to can be minimized. The previous test was like a machine gun going off next to the ear – with this method it will be much more comfortable,” said Karl-Johan Fredén Jansson, PhD, also of Chalmers. “The test can be performed at 40 decibels lower than today's method using air conducted sounds through headphones. This eliminates any risk that the test itself could cause hearing damage.”

In a traditional vestibular investigation, two variants of VEMP tests are used today: air transmitted sound through headphones or bone conducted sounds via a vibrating device attached to the head. When air transmitted sounds are used, high sound levels are required, which is uncomfortable to the patient and there is a risk of hearing damage. For bone conducted sound, the sound levels are lower, but the equipment currently available on the market is large and cumbersome, and therefore difficult to use.


Related Links:
Chalmers University of Technology
Ortofon
Sahlgrenska Academy


Gold Supplier
Premium Ultrasound Scanner
ARIETTA 850
New
Surgical Light
HyLED 600 Series
New
Electric Suction Machine
YX980D
New
Smart nCPAP Device
SVAAS nCPAP

Print article

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: A novel research study moves the needle on predicting coronary artery disease (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

AI-Enabled ECG Analysis Predicts Heart Attack Risk Nearly as well as CT Scans

Increased coronary artery calcium is a marker of coronary artery disease that can lead to a heart attack. Traditionally, CT scans are used to diagnose buildup of coronary artery calcium, although CT scanners... Read more

Critical Care

view channel
Image: The advanced electronic skin could enable multiplex healthcare monitoring (Photo courtesy of Terasaki Institute)

First-of-Its-Kind Electronic Skin Patch Enables Advanced Health Care Monitoring

For some time now, electronic skin (E-skin) patches have been used to monitor bodily physiological and chemical indicators of health. Such monitors, placed on the skin, are capable of measuring various... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: The neuro-chip with soft implantable electrodes could manage brain disorders (Photo courtesy of EPFL)

Implantable Neuro-Chip Uses Machine Learning Algorithm to Detect and Treat Neurological Disorders

Using a combination of low-power chip design, machine learning algorithms, and soft implantable electrodes, researchers have produced a neural interface that can identify and suppress symptoms of different... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: Using digital data can improve health outcomes (Photo courtesy of Unsplash)

Electronic Health Records May Be Key to Improving Patient Care, Study Finds

When a patient gets transferred from a hospital to a nearby specialist or rehabilitation facility, it is often difficult for personnel at the new facility to access the patient’s electronic health records... Read more

Point of Care

view channel
Image: Steripath improves the diagnostic accuracy and timeliness of sepsis test results (Photo courtesy of Magnolia)

All-in-One Device Reduces False-Positive Diagnostic Test Results for Bloodstream Infections

Blood cultures are considered the gold standard diagnostic test for the detection of blood stream infections, such as sepsis. However, positive blood culture results can be frequently wrong, and about... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: Researchers expect broader adoption of AI in healthcare in the near future (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Could Save U.S. Healthcare Industry USD 360 Billion Annually

The wider adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in healthcare could save the U.S. up to USD 360 billion annually although its uptake in the industry is presently limited owing to the absence of trust... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2023 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.