We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us

Download Mobile App





Assessing Stiffness of Arteries Could Help Identify Patients Most at Risk of Dying From COVID-19

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 13 Oct 2021
Print article
Illustration
Illustration

Assessing the stiffness of the arteries could help identify patients most at risk of dying from COVID-19, new research has revealed.

Researchers at Newcastle University (Newcastle, Tyne and Wear, UK) have shown that estimated pulse wave velocity (ePWV), a readily available marker of aortic stiffening, can be an effective addition in identifying patients at risk of death in hospital due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Accurate risk stratification at hospital admission of these patients is of utmost clinical importance as it is needed to guide therapeutic strategies.

ePWV is a measurement of arterial stiffness that is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. It can be measured simply and noninvasively by measuring the carotid and femoral pulse pressures, with sensors on the ankles and neck, and the time delay between the two or by other methods relying on pulse-wave analysis. The study carried out in two cohorts of hospitalized COVID-19 patients demonstrated that ePWV provides an additional clinical tool to refine risk stratification of hospitalized patients beyond established risk factors and scores. It was found that the addition of ePWV to clinical predictive markers or a validated mortality score improved the prognostic value for in-hospital mortality and therefore, could facilitate therapeutic decisions in acute COVID-19 disease.

The team found that the optimal prognostic ePWV value was 13.0 m/sec for predicting in-hospital mortality. When the total cohort of patients with COVID-19 was compared with the total control cohort, ePWV progressively increased across the controls, COVID-19 survivors and COVID-19 patients who didn’t survive after controlling for age, sex, hypertension and other relevant factors. ePWV was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients as compared to their non-COVID-19 counterparts.

The readily available measure of arterial stiffness when used in addition to tools already recommended in clinical practice may facilitate therapeutic decisions in acute COVID-19 disease. The team will be continuing further research in this area to develop the technique and seek its validation into health service practice.

“Our findings suggest that increased aortic stiffening may serve as a predictor of mortality in COVID-19 infection reflecting a cumulative surrogate of ageing and high-risk cardiovascular profile,” said Professor Stellos, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Newcastle University and Heidelberg University.

Related Links:
Newcastle University 


Print article
IIR Middle East

Channels

Critical Care

view channel
Image: Three dimensional measurement of the all-mesh thermistor (Photo courtesy of Shinshu University)

Ultraflexible, Gas-Permeable Thermistors to Pave Way for On-Skin Medical Sensors and Implantable Devices

On-skin medical sensors and wearable health devices are important health care tools that must be incredibly flexible and ultrathin so they can move with the human body. In addition, the technology has... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: The POINT Kinguide robotic-assisted surgical system has made its debut in the US (Photo courtesy of Point Robotics)

First-Ever Spinal Surgical Hand-Held Robot Makes Worldwide Debut

The world’s first ever hand-held robot framework equipped with a parallel manipulator for orthopedic application has made its worldwide debut in the U.S. Point Robotics MedTech Inc. (Taipei, Taiwan) has... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: The biomolecular film can be picked up with tweezers and placed onto a wound (Photo courtesy of TUM)

Biomolecular Wound Healing Film Adheres to Sensitive Tissue and Releases Active Ingredients

Conventional bandages may be very effective for treating smaller skin abrasions, but things get more difficult when it comes to soft-tissue injuries such as on the tongue or on sensitive surfaces like... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: Using digital data can improve health outcomes (Photo courtesy of Unsplash)

Electronic Health Records May Be Key to Improving Patient Care, Study Finds

When a patient gets transferred from a hospital to a nearby specialist or rehabilitation facility, it is often difficult for personnel at the new facility to access the patient’s electronic health records... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.