We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

Hydration Sensor Could Improve Kidney Dialysis

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 06 Aug 2019
Print article
Image: A noninvasive hydration sensor based on the same technology as MRI can fit in a doctor’s office (Photo courtesy of Lina Colucci/ MIT).
Image: A noninvasive hydration sensor based on the same technology as MRI can fit in a doctor’s office (Photo courtesy of Lina Colucci/ MIT).
A portable sensor can be used to accurately measure hydration levels using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry, claims a new study.

Developed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH; Boston, USA) and other institutions, the portable NMR sensor is designed to assess tissue fluid status in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, who often experience swelling in the lower limbs due to excess extracellular fluid. The portable NMR sensor is based on the same technology as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, but can be used to obtain measurements at a fraction of the cost and time, as there is no imaging involved.

The sensor works by measuring hydrogen T2 relaxation time, which quantifies both the environment and quantity of hydrogen atoms (or water molecules). Study results showed that NMR relaxometry can distinguish healthy patients from those needing dialysis, and can also detect excess fluid in the body before traditional clinical signs are present. According to the researchers, the sensor could be used to determine when a patient reaches their true dry weight, and this determination could be personalized at each dialysis treatment. The study was published on July 24, 2019, in Science Translational Medicine.

“The beauty of magnetic resonance compared to other modalities for assessing hydration is that the magnetic resonance signal comes exclusively from hydrogen atoms. And most of the hydrogen atoms in the human body are found in water molecules,” said lead author Lina Colucci, PhD, of MIT. “Such a device could be useful for not only dialysis patients but also people with congestive heart failure, as well as athletes and elderly people who may be in danger of becoming dehydrated.”

“There’s a tremendous need across many different patient populations to know whether they have too much water or too little water,” said senior author Professor Michael Cima, PhD, of the MIT department of materials science and engineering. “Identifying fluid accumulation early has been shown to reduce hospitalization, but right now there are no ways to quantify low-level fluid accumulation. This is a way we could measure directly, in every patient, how close they are to a normal hydration state.”

Related Links:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts General Hospital


Print article

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: Cardiologs Holter arrhythmia diagnostic software is cloud-based, vendor-neutral and powered by AI (Photo courtesy of Cardiologs)

AI Predicts Short-Term Risk of Atrial Fibrillation Using 24-Hour Holter Recordings

Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) affects millions of people each year. However, the condition is often unrecognized and untreated. Nowadays, patients are subject to 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiograms (ECGs)... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: The Senhance surgical system with digital laparoscopy (Photo courtesy of Asensus Surgical)

Digital Laparoscopic Platform Leverages Augmented Intelligence and Machine Learning

Challenges in laparoscopic surgery can impact cost, utilization, effectiveness, and outcomes of the procedure. For instance, the inability of the surgeon to control vision can create efficiency and safety... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: The biomolecular film can be picked up with tweezers and placed onto a wound (Photo courtesy of TUM)

Biomolecular Wound Healing Film Adheres to Sensitive Tissue and Releases Active Ingredients

Conventional bandages may be very effective for treating smaller skin abrasions, but things get more difficult when it comes to soft-tissue injuries such as on the tongue or on sensitive surfaces like... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: AI can reveal a patient`s heart health (Photo courtesy of Mayo Clinic)

AI Trained for Specific Vocal Biomarkers Could Accurately Predict Coronary Artery Disease

Earlier studies have examined the use of voice analysis for identifying voice markers associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Other research groups have explored the use of similar... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: Expanding the role of autonomous robots can mitigate the shortage of physicians (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Robot-Assisted Surgical Devices Market Driven by Increased Demand for Patient-Specific Surgeries

An aging population and accompanying retirements will cause a significant physician shortfall of 55,000 to 150,000 by 2030, creating a gap in the healthcare system. Expanding the role of autonomous robots... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.