We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Ampronix,  Inc

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.
29 Aug 2020 - 02 Sep 2020
Virtual Venue

Female Physicians Earn Less Than Their Male Colleagues

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 18 Jul 2016
Print article
Image: New research shows female academic physicians at public medical schools in the U.S. receive a lower average salary than their male counterparts (Photo courtesy of Thinkstock).
Image: New research shows female academic physicians at public medical schools in the U.S. receive a lower average salary than their male counterparts (Photo courtesy of Thinkstock).
Researchers at Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA, USA), the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA, USA), and other institutions analyzed salary information data for 10,241 academic physicians (34.7% women) at 24 public medical schools in 12 U.S. states with salary information published online, in line with Freedom of Information laws. They then linked the data with detailed information on sex, age, years of experience, faculty rank, specialty, scientific authorship, funding, clinical trial participation, and Medicare reimbursements.

The results showed that female physicians had lower mean salaries (USD 206,641) than male ones (USD 257,957). The sex differences persisted after multivariable adjustment, with an absolute difference of USD 19,878. Women physicians were less likely than men to be full professors, they tended to be younger, and more women specialized in internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and pediatrics. Woman also had fewer total publications, were less likely to have funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and less likely to have conducted a clinical trial. The study was published on July 11, 2016, in JAMA Internal Medicine.

“Our use of publicly available state employee salary data highlights the importance of physician salary transparency to efforts to reduce the male-female earnings gap,” concluded lead author Anupam Jena, MD, PhD, of Harvard Medical School, and colleagues. “Significant sex differences in salary exist even after accounting for age, experience, specialty, faculty rank, and measures of research productivity and clinical revenue.”

Related Links:
Harvard Medical School
U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research


Print article

Channels

Business

view channel
Illustration

Siemens to Acquire Varian Medical to Create Comprehensive Cancer Portfolio

Siemens Healthineers (Erlangen, Germany) has entered into an agreement to acquire Varian Medical Systems, Inc. (Palo Alto, CA, USA) that will lead to the creation of a global leader in healthcare with... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2020 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.