We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.

Interventional Radiology Procedure Can Treat Female Infertility

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 09 Jun 2022
Print article
Image: Simple diagnostic procedure and treatment can provide clarity on infertility and hope for conception (Photo courtesy of Pexels)
Image: Simple diagnostic procedure and treatment can provide clarity on infertility and hope for conception (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

A simple diagnostic procedure, followed by an interventional radiology treatment known as fallopian tube recanalization, could allow a high percentage of women struggling with infertility from blocked fallopian tubes to conceive with less involved or, in some cases, no further invasive fertility procedures.

Researchers at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, BC, Canada) studied cases from 2015 to 2021 involving 956 women with infertility who previously had been diagnosed as having one or both fallopian tubes blocked based on the standard diagnostic procedure used to assess the openness of fallopian tubes, known as hysterosalpingogram (HSG). The women then underwent a selective salpingography to confirm their HSG diagnosis and, if needed, underwent fallopian tube recanalization. In many cases, researchers said, the purported blockage was only a piece of mucus that was easily removed.

Selective salpingography uses X-ray guidance to insert a tiny catheter through the cervix and into the opening of the fallopian tubes. A contrast dye is then injected to assess whether the tubes are open or blocked. The interventional radiologist, in many cases, is then able to perform recanalization which opens the tube using a fine guidewire. The procedure is performed as an outpatient under light sedation and typically takes under 30 minutes.

In the study, selective salpingography showed that nearly one in four (23.8%) had been mistakenly told they had one or both blocked fallopian tubes. Of those with a blockage, over half (56.7%) were unblocked using a fine wire in the fallopian recanalization process, researchers said. In sum, 80.5% of women in the study who had previously been told they had tubal blockages left the same day with both fallopian tubes open after a simple outpatient procedure. In an additional 15.9% a more precise diagnosis of significant tubal disease was made that in many cases, potentially altered treatment options. The research suggests that selective salpingography should be offered more broadly in assessing and treating female infertility.

“This procedure and treatment can help women make an informed decision about infertility treatments. And for many, it can actually give them the chance to conceive naturally,” said Lindsay Machan, MD, associate professor in the Department of Radiology at the University of British Columbia and a lead author of the study. “Fertility treatments can be expensive and out of reach for many women. Infertility is also an emotional, often heart-breaking journey, so having this diagnostic procedure and treatment available could be life-changing.”

Related Links:
University of British Columbia 


Print article
Radcal

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: ‘Hologram patients’ developed to help train doctors and nurses (Photo courtesy of University of Cambridge)

Life-Like Hologram Patients Train Doctors for Real-Time Decision Making in Emergencies

A medical training project using 'mixed reality' technology aims to make consistent, high-level and relevant clinical training more accessible across the world. University of Cambridge (Cambridge, UK)... Read more

Critical Care

view channel
Image: New device could provide alternative to opioids and other highly addictive drugs (Photo courtesy of Northwestern University)

Dissolving Implantable Device Can Manage Post-Operative Pain Without Drugs

Researchers have developed a small, soft, flexible implant that relieves pain on demand without the use of drugs. The first-of-its-kind device could provide a much-needed alternative to opioids and other... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: The biomolecular film can be picked up with tweezers and placed onto a wound (Photo courtesy of TUM)

Biomolecular Wound Healing Film Adheres to Sensitive Tissue and Releases Active Ingredients

Conventional bandages may be very effective for treating smaller skin abrasions, but things get more difficult when it comes to soft-tissue injuries such as on the tongue or on sensitive surfaces like... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: AI can reveal a patient`s heart health (Photo courtesy of Mayo Clinic)

AI Trained for Specific Vocal Biomarkers Could Accurately Predict Coronary Artery Disease

Earlier studies have examined the use of voice analysis for identifying voice markers associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Other research groups have explored the use of similar... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: Expanding the role of autonomous robots can mitigate the shortage of physicians (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Robot-Assisted Surgical Devices Market Driven by Increased Demand for Patient-Specific Surgeries

An aging population and accompanying retirements will cause a significant physician shortfall of 55,000 to 150,000 by 2030, creating a gap in the healthcare system. Expanding the role of autonomous robots... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.