We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience. This includes personalizing content and advertising. To learn more, click here. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies. Cookie Policy.

Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
Detecto

Download Mobile App




Events

ATTENTION: Due to the COVID-19 PANDEMIC, many events are being rescheduled for a later date, converted into virtual venues, or altogether cancelled. Please check with the event organizer or website prior to planning for any forthcoming event.
09 Dec 2022 - 11 Dec 2022

Ultrasound-Guided Surgery More Effective for Treating Early Form of Breast Cancer

By HospiMedica International staff writers
Posted on 21 Nov 2022
Print article
Image: Surgeon using IOUS to guide breast surgery (Photo courtesy of Clinica Universidad de Navarra)
Image: Surgeon using IOUS to guide breast surgery (Photo courtesy of Clinica Universidad de Navarra)

Using ultrasound to guide surgery for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) gives better results than the standard technique of using a wire inserted into the breast, according to new research. The technique, known as intraoperative ultrasound, or IOUS, enables surgeons to remove a smaller quantity of breast tissue, while still removing all the of DCIS tissue. Using IOUS improves the chance of having no cancer cells at the outer edge of the tissue that was removed (known as positive margins), reducing the risk of patients needing a second operation. Because IOUS negates the need for inserting a guide wire, this technique could also reduce pain and preoperative stress for patients and save time for medical staff.

The research carried out by a team at Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Madrid, Spain) involved 108 people who were diagnosed with DCIS and treated between February 2018 and December 2021. Forty-one were treated with IOUS-guided surgery while 67 were treated with surgery guided by wire localization (WL). Following each operation, the tissue removed was analyzed to see how much was removed and whether there were ‘positive margins’. This means that DCIS cells were found at the edge of the tissue removed, suggesting some DCIS cells could have been left behind and patients would probably need a second operation.

Among those treated using WL, seven (10.4%) had positive margins and needed a second operation while in those treated using IOUS, there were only two patients (4.8%) with positive margins who needed a second operation. The patients have been followed up for a year and half so far and cancer has only recurred in one (who was treated with WL). The researchers plan to continue gathering information about patients having surgery for DCIS in the hopes of seeing long-term benefits of using IOUS.

“DCIS is a common form of early breast cancer that can develop into a more serious, invasive cancer. To ensure it does not progress, patients are usually offered surgery. Because DCIS does not usually create lumps in the breast, we need a good technique to guide surgery and make it accurate as possible,” said Dr. Antonio J. Esgueva at Clinica Universidad de Navarra. “As breast surgeons, we want to perform the very best oncological surgery in terms of removing any trace of DCIS but also removing as little of the breast tissue as possible in order to have the best cosmetic result possible. At the same time, we also want to improve patients' experience during treatment by using less invasive techniques and reducing their anxiety. Our research suggests that using intraoperative ultrasound, a quicker and less invasive technique, is effective for guiding DCIS surgery.”

“Once intervention is planned, the standard treatment for patients diagnosed with DCIS is surgery. The need for a second operation due to positive margins can be an issue. This research is promising because it shows that a kinder technique can help guide surgeons to effectively remove DCIS from the breast while minimising unwanted side-effects,” added Dr. Laura Biganzoli, Co-Chair of the European Breast Cancer Conference and Director of the Breast Centre at Santo Stefano Hospital, Prato, Italy, who was not involved in the research.

Related Links:
Clinica Universidad de Navarra

BMP Whole Blood Analyzer: GEM Premier ChemSTAT
New
Gold Supplier
POC Test Reader
NycoCard READER II
New
Gold Supplier
Group A Streptococcus Antigen Test
OSOM Strep A Test
New
Direct LDL Assay
Direct LDL-C

Print article
Radcal

Channels

AI

view channel
Image: AI transforms smartwatch ECG signals into a diagnostic tool for heart failure (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

AI-Based Smartwatch Accurately Detects Heart Failure Using ECG Signals

People with a weak heart pump might not have symptoms, but this common form of heart disease affects about 2% of the population and 9% of people over 60. When the heart cannot pump enough oxygen-rich blood,... Read more

Critical Care

view channel
Image: Quantra Hemostasis Analyzer (Photo courtesy of HemoSonics)

Next-Gen POC Whole Blood Hemostasis System Recognizes Specific Needs of EDs and ORs

Current hemostatic tests provide only a subset of needed information, or take too long to be useful in critical bleeding situations, forcing clinicians to use iterative transfusion protocols that do not... Read more

Surgical Techniques

view channel
Image: CystoSmart image enhancement and AI diagnostic tool will enhance cancer detection (Photo courtesy of Claritas HealthTech)

AI Diagnostic Tool Improves Cancer Detection in Cystoscope Images of Bladder

Bladder cancer is the 10th commonest cancer worldwide and the 6th commonest cancer amongst men. It is known to have high recurrence rates and significant risks of disease progression. Early detection of... Read more

Patient Care

view channel
Image: Automated cleaning system allows endoscopes to be cleaned direct from clinic (Photo courtesy of Aston University)

World’s First Automated Endoscope Cleaner Fights Antimicrobial Resistance

Endoscopes are long, thin tubes with a light and camera at one end. Due to the sensitivity of the materials and electronics they cannot be sterilized in an autoclave (a machine that uses steam under pressure),... Read more

Health IT

view channel
Image: Using digital data can improve health outcomes (Photo courtesy of Unsplash)

Electronic Health Records May Be Key to Improving Patient Care, Study Finds

When a patient gets transferred from a hospital to a nearby specialist or rehabilitation facility, it is often difficult for personnel at the new facility to access the patient’s electronic health records... Read more

Business

view channel
Image: The global multiparameter patient monitoring systems market is expected to surpass USD 15 billion by 2028 (Photo courtesy of Unsplash)

Global Multiparameter Patient Monitoring Systems Market Driven by Rising Chronic Illnesses

Multi-parameter patient monitoring equipment is used to assess the vital signs of patients who are suffering from a serious illness. These devices are meant to give the number of data sets on one screen... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2022 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.